Future of Talent Weekend — Join me?

firepit

Gather talent executives from two dozen Fortune 500’s for a long weekend of conversations about what matters most. Meet in an inspirational spot on the Northern California coast.  trends

What do people talk about? The future, mainly. We talk through the trends that are likely to persist. Kevin Wheeler‘s annual forecast lights the fire. Back and forth discussion draws everyone in. why

Kevin started Future of Talent ten years ago, and I’ve attended every one! This one weekend per year has profoundly shaped how I think about learning, talent, and the future of HR.

Late September’s session has a few more openings.

Call me if you’d like to know more. Disclaimer: Kevin is a personal friend, but I’m not on commission. I promote this event because I’m a true believer.

Three days a year helps keep sharp people sharp. Not a bad deal.

 

 

 

 

 

Top posts on Working Smarter for April 2014

STEPHEN DOWNES: HALF AN HOUR

APRIL 21, 2014

Connectivism as Learning Theory

‘I think the students in the Building Online Collaborative Environments Course has an almost impossible task. Here is their effort to prove that connectivism is a learning theory. Connectivism has a direct impact on education and teaching as it works as a learning theory. They sat in desks, read from a textbook, and completed worksheets. Gibson.
JOHN HAGEL

APRIL 24, 2014

Personal Narratives: Insight and Impact

‘We all have a personal narrative, even though few of us have made the effort to articulate it.   That’s a shame because our personal narrative can be a source of deep insight as well as a great way to amplify impact. Done right, they can be a powerful weapon in helping us to escape from the dark side of technology. What can I accomplish?
EUEN SEMPLE

APRIL 15, 2014

Feeling trapped

‘I often worry about coming across as a smart arse, sniping at organisational life from the sidelines. It”s easy for me, I work for myself. have a degree of agency that many would envy. But I remember. remember the creeping feeling that something”s not right but that you can”t do anything to make things better. Then I read. still do.
IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER

APRIL 2, 2014

Innovation Hubs in the Global Digital Economy

a paper by UC Berkeley professor John Zysman.  It creates opportunities and challenges.”  . Others have tried to become the Next Silicon Valley.
79 Tweets 66 Tweets 15 Tweets 20 Tweets

Would you recommend your L&D department?

Capturing L&D metrics too often entails asking the wrong people the wrong questions at the wrong time.

Line leaders are a CLO’s most important customers. They judge the trade-offs in spending that determine L&D’s fate in the budget process. They base their decisions on what training professionals call Level 4: Did the training impact the bottom line? Did it matter?

By and large, line leaders are not happy with L&D’s performance.

A survey of thousands of line leaders found that 77% were dissatisfied with the results of L&D. A mere 24% agreed that L&D was critical to business outcomes. Only 15% thought L&D effective at influencing talent strategy. 14% would recommend working with L&D; 52% would not; 34% were passive. (Statistics from 2011 Corporate Leadership Council, L&D Team Capabilities Survey)

If a line of business reported such shoddy scores, red flags would arise and heads would roll. A corporate SWAT team would tear into the problem. Was L&D operating this poorly or had it earned an undeservedly bad reputation? How can we put this train back on the track?

The way to succeed with line leaders is to involve them in the governance process. Acknowledge that they are L&D’s customers. Gain their support by planning with them. Monitor trends in their assessments of L&D. Use their feedback to make improvements.

What’s the appropriate yardstick for measuring the confidence and loyalty of line leader customers? I propose that CLOs adopt the Net Promoter Score® methodology developed by Fred Reichheld at Bain & Company and Satmatrix.

The Net Promoter Score® measures loyalty based on one question, “How likely are you to recommend our service to friends and colleagues?” Scoring is from 0 (Not likely at all) to 10 (Extremely likely). A open-ended question often follows to provide guidance for corrective action.

Here’s how it works: Survey your customers. Calculate the percentage of detractors (scores 0-6) and the percentage of promoters (scores 9-10). Your Net Promoter Score is the percentage of promoters minus the percentage of detractors. Passives (scores 7-8) don’t count in the equation.

In a variety of industries, Net Promoter Score correlate directly with differences in growth rates among competitors. (Fred Reichheld, The One Number You Need to Grow, Harvard Business Review, December 2003).

Customer loyalty increases profitability. It’s less costly to keep a customer than to acquire a new one. Loyal customers who talk up a company lower the expense of gaining new customers. If you’re like me, when a company exceeds your expectations, you’re much more likely to come back.

Reichheld and his peers tracked more than 10,000 Net Promoter Scores at 400 companies. This one simply number explained the growth rates in industries as different as airlines, internet service provides, and car rental companies.

Now that we’ve determined who to ask (line leaders) and what to ask them (“Would you recommend…?), let’s turn to when to ask them.

My Internet service provider asks if I would recommend their service at the conclusion of every support call. Many online merchants ask the question immediately after taking an order. Airlines distribute questionnaires to people in flight.

CLOs should wait six months before asking the question. Unlike a product that will be delivered in two business days, it takes a while for lessons to sink in and/or to disappear due to the Forgetting Curve.

You may be wondering why Net Promoter Score hasn’t taken the world by storm. Reichheld thinks that maybe market research firms can’t find a way to make money administering something so simple.

Simplicity is the hallmark of the Net Promoter Score, so much so that it represents a phase change in how we regard metrics. Instead of being buried in quarterly reports read by few, the Net Promoter Score can become a management tool.

The prime directive of any organization is to create customers. The Net Promoter Score shows how the organization is doing in terms all managers and workers can understand. The score points to relationships that need improvement. Practitioners actively intervene to convert detractors into promoters. Insiders call this “closing the loop.” Some companies factor it into the calculation of incentive compensation.

As Reichheld says, “The path to sustainable, profitable growth begins with creating more promoters and fewer detractors and making your net-promoter number transparent throughout your organization. This number is the one number you need to grow. It’s that simple and that profound.”

________________________

This column appears in the April 2014 issue of Chief Learning Officer.

Quicktime vs YouTube vs ?

Here’s a shot from a Quicktime video on my desktop:

quicktimeHere’s the same scene from a video uploaded to YouTube.youtube

YouTube roughs up the video.

I’m going to need another place to post videos. Anyone got a suggestion?

Getting To Yes!

I’ve resolved to get better at taking video and I plan to share my journey online. I’m going to produce several book reviews as practice. Expect #bloopers.

Video notes:

I shot this several months ago with a four-year old $900 Canon HF10 videocam. The camera has crapped out: left sound monitoring is laden with static. Only records the left channel. It’s also a pain to thrash through the settings. I’ve posted this for comparison to video from my new camera.

nikon

For Christmas, I gave myself a Nikon D5200 DSLR for $500. Now I’m learning how to use it to capture video vignettes.

I need some guinea pigs to practice on. Perhaps yourself if you want to drop by my studio in Berkeley. I can also make local house calls for a shoot.

The Weary Optmist

wearyI am half way through reading a novel entitled The Weary Optimist, a novel of Bad Bosses, Bad Jobs, Bad Sex and “The 36 Reasons To Be Glad You Don’t Work in Human Resources” by Dale Dauten. I’m ROTFL.

We would try to create training designed for the very people who made the crack about getting out of training classes. We developed online training experiences, and if they watched the videos and answered a few questions about htem, they could skip attendance at the classroom session.

 

It works so well that we were able to greatly reduce the number of classroom sessions, which saved a fortune in Danishes and bagels alone, not to mention staff hours. Genius, no?

 

No.

 

It turns out that very few people who work in Training are interested in ways to eliminate people who work in Training.