The Learning Business – Internet Time Blog http://www.internettime.com Thu, 05 Nov 2015 01:35:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Jane Hart’s Top 100 Learning Tools http://www.internettime.com/2015/08/jane-harts-top-100-learning-tools/ Thu, 27 Aug 2015 21:13:54 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=20288 Continue reading Jane Hart’s Top 100 Learning Tools ]]> top100

It’s time once again to contribute to Jane Hart’s annual survey of tools for learning. I was the first person to take part in this project some nine years ago and now it’s an annual ritual. It’s enlightening to review what’s best in the toolbox.

My top tools for learning are:

  • Experience. Extracting the lessons of simply living my life.
  • Friends. My colleagues in Internet Time Alliance and colleagues.
  • Books. I have an extensive library and am in the midst of looking back through to refresh what I’ve learned from them.
  • Journals.  I buy a new black book at KaDeWe in Berlin every year to draw and write in.

These won’t be on my submission to Jane, because for purposes of the survey:

A learning tool is any software or online tool or service that you use either for your own personal or professional learning or for teaching or training.

      1. WordPress. My blog is where I reflect on things and share them with others. I’m still old-school on this, writing whatever I feel like. One reader complained, saying “I thought this was a blog about L&D.” Well, no, my blog covers whatever grabs my attention and that’s less and less about L&D.
      2. Twitter. I learn new things every day, following the links offered up by the 250 people I follow. I have 9,000 followers who provide feedback or answer my questions. (Jane has 26,000 followers.)
      3. Skype.  I like to see the person I’m talking with. Also, Skype’s great for talking with a group of people at once.
      4. Google. Many times I’ll be searching my own sites. I really enjoy using Google to search images. They are very useful when I’m trying to get different perspectives on a concept. If I need to remember who someone in a photograph is, Google will tell me about 80% of the time.
      5. YouTube. I tap YouTube for entertainment and publishing videos. YouTube also showed me what we wrong with my fridge and taught me how to create 300 dpi imagery with Photoshop,
      6. Flickr. Flickr enables me to enjoy memories of times past. Since 2001, I’ve posted 32,000 photographs.  I’ll admit to revisiting Monterey Car Week half a dozen times.20018082444_08f995c1e3_z
      7. Scoop.it. I curate five topics on Scoop.it (example). You really learn something when you share it with someone else. As master curator Robin Good suggests, you need to give your opinion to add value. It keeps you on your toes. Plus, searching for fresh content puts you in touch with the latest news.
      8. Diigo. Bookmarks are my external memory. In the course of researching two books, I’ve created nearly 3,000 bookmarks. (Here are the current bookmarks related to my book on DIY learning.) A side benefit is the ability to share your bookmarks with other.
      9. SurveyShare. I take surveys to find out where groups are at. One is currently collecting feedback from people who read my new book.
      10. The cloud. I store all my files online, in Dropbox, Google Docs, and iCloud. Since I work on three or four different computers, it’s great to have all my stuff available no matter where I’m signing in from.

Honorable mention:

VLC. This little freeware tool plays just about any video format you can throw at it.

iMovie. As movie editors go, this one’s simple as can be. It has its limitations, especially if you want to edit multiple tracks, but the output is excellent and it’s free on Macs.

PowerPoint. I’m not your conventional, bullet-pointed presenters. I use PPT for making simple diagram, for storing visuals, and keeping up with visual models. Every year I start a new PPT of general graphics.

neuronsPowerPoint image for Aha! book

#itashare

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Think for yourselves, plagiarists http://www.internettime.com/2015/08/think-for-yourselves-plagiarists/ Wed, 26 Aug 2015 19:37:39 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=20264 Continue reading Think for yourselves, plagiarists ]]> informalIn 2006, Jossey-Bass published a book of mine on Informal Learning.

The book describes informal learning as “the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way people learn to do their jobs”

It compares formal learning to riding a bus and informal learning to riding a bicycle.

The book says that “Work = Learning; Learning = Work.”

Plagiarists
For the second time in a week, I came upon words I had written, unattributed, in an infographic and  a presentation on the web.

I put “unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu” and “informal learning bicycle bus” into Google and found those three words, verbatim but unattributed, in these works:

huffpostThis infographic on Informal Learning appears in Huffington Post.

ASTD InfoLine: Designing for Informal Learning by Bruno Neal, Linda Hainlen. “Informal Learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs….”

The most blatant rip-off is by Brainshark‘s Audrey Polce who uses my bus and bicycle analogy and wording without attribution in a webinar entitled Using Brainshark for Formal and Informal Learning. From her slides: bus:bike

[Update, from Twitter August 27th:

  1. How is informal learning like riding a bike? Apologies to , the original source of this great analogy:

  2. (3/3) It is never our intent to misappropriate information, and we apologize for the mix up.

    Brian also Tweeted me that this was completely unintentional. I don’t understand how Audrey could have unintentionally presented several paragraphs of my ideas as her own when clearly they were not.

    I’ve accepted their apology because feuding’s not fun.]

Informal vs. Formal Learning: What’s the Difference? by Brendan Cournoyer, Director of  Content Marketing, Brainshark. Cournoyer thanks her for this knowledge in another post. “We can liken the difference between formal and informal learning to travelling on a bus vs riding a bike (thanks to Audrey Polce for this metaphor.”

Most of this next batch use the words “unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs.” Often that’s the only transgression, although to my way of thinking, that’s enough. When you quote someone word for word, you need to acknowledge your source.

Informal Learning Management, Evaluation, Regulation by Brian Swisher on the “eLearning Heroes” site. “I am writing a paper for my ISD Masters Program on informal learning. Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs.”

 How social  networks and Web 2.0 can support informal learning in your company or organization, EU Net Knowing Project,  funded by EU Leonardo da Vinci Programme in the framework of Lifelong Learning European Programme. “Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way people learn to do their jobs.”

Learning Networking through Mobile Apps, proposal defense by jepputeh iot. “Informal Learning: Unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way of us learn to do our jobs”

Informal Learning Context, EDU 09 – THEORETICAL BASE  OF  PHYSICAL SCIENCE EDUCATION – II by T.K Thankcom. “Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs. Informal learning is like riding a bicycle: the rider chooses the destination and the route.

Organizations and Cultures by dcarmona.”Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way people learn to do their jobs.”

A Study: Informal Learning & Formal Learning in a General Music Classroom by Joon Hwang WONG Raffles Institution, Singapore. Presented at the 32nd World Conference of the International Society for Music Education. “informal learning takes place in an unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs. ”

The words pop up on at least five term-paper writing services (although they may all be drawing on the same batch of papers) but I’m not about to pay a fee to read my own purloined words.

My take on this
I don’t promote Informal Learning for the money. Believe me, it’s not lucrative. I spread the gospel of informal learning because I’m convinced it works and it feels like the right thing to do. I’m a true believer, but I don’t like to feel that people, especially LMS vendors, are taking advantage of me.

A couple of weeks ago, I came upon an LMS vendor’s site that described his company’s way of doing things with several paragraphs lifted directly from one of my white papers. The CEO apologized profusely and we had a lovely conversation. The fellow who wrote the copy said “I used your blog structure as an idea however must have published the wrong version with your text rather than mine.” Uh huh.

 

This is hardly the first time. Three years ago I blogged Where to Draw the Line on Plagiarism? and gave several examples:

This morning I looked at a presentation on SlideShare by the head of learning of an Irish insurance company. Eight of the 33 slides were copied from a colleague’s presentation deck without attribution. Another slide credits me but gets the numbers wrong and attributes the idea to Time Magazine instead of Internet Time Group.

One slide re-labels Charles Jennings’ examples of 70:20:10 as 50:20:30 — I guess the presenter couldn’t believe that formal learning had such little impact. Another slide quotes a Nobel Laureate but fails to acknowledge that the quote was borrowed from Charles’ presentation. The Irish presentation had been rekeyed. Hint: keying someone’s material into your presentation doesn’t make it yours.

It gets worse. Clark Quinn and I found an entire white paper we’d co-authored on an international university’s site. It reappeared word for word — except for our names, which were nowhere to be found. It looked as if the university had written it. When we called them on it, their first defense was that they had found it on the web and couldn’t remember where. I demanded an apology; the university said it was not at fault. I gave them a choice: I would out them as brazen intellectual property thieves or they would take down the article immediately. They chose the latter.

Last month an LMS vendor borrowed 200 words from my site without attribution. They told me it was a mistake. The post now acknowledges *research authored and compiled by Jay Cross at: http://www.informl.com/where-did-the-80-come-from/

Marcia Conner once sent me a book, not a very good one, that printed 30 pages from my site without permission! These are not isolated instances.

I wrote a professor in New Zealand that “Your presentation presents words and graphics from three principals of of Internet Time Alliance (Charles Jennings, Jane Hart, and myself) without attribution and in violation of international copyright law.” He wrote back, “My sincerest apologies. I thought I had properly cited the work but it was not at all. Shame. I have removed the presentations. If you would like more recompense please let me know.” I told him “No need to remove the presentation. Just note sources for our material.”

I think I’ve been too much of a softie. I am fed up.

Future response
Maybe there’s an opportunity hidden here.

Henceforth, when I come upon plagiarism of more than a handful of words, I’m going to send the transgressor a link to this post and a bill for $1,000. If it’s a Fortune 50 company, it will be for $5,000.

If I don’t get a satisfactory response, I will out the company on Twitter and append the incident to this post.

plagiarism

 

#itashare

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Project Aha! http://www.internettime.com/2015/03/project-aha/ http://www.internettime.com/2015/03/project-aha/#comments Wed, 11 Mar 2015 06:43:27 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=19860 Continue reading Project Aha! ]]> Aha! is a set of practices I’m developing to help pull-workers learn to learn. I’m investigating what it takes for a learner to become self-sufficient, to both learn and design learning experiences. I’d like to make that easier.

books

My bookshelves groan under more than 200 books on learning and development. (I’ve recycled many to get down to this.) They contain studies of learning from the frameworks of design, teaching, networks, tech, brain science, and positive psychology. How many books look at learning from the point of view of the learner? None that I know of. Nada. It’s time to design some self-help.

As corporations flatten and digitize, millions of people are being handed responsibility for their own learning, by plan or by default. Corporations that decentralize often leave people to sink or swim. Learning — that ultimate competitive advantage in a fast-changing world — is too important to leave to chance any longer. Besides, learning can be a fulfilling, nourishing aspect of work; folks need to know how to make the best of it.

As business grows ever more complex, fast, and confusing, the quality of learning must increase. Learning professionals know a lot about ideal conditions for learning and what blend of things works when. Rarely have they shared this wisdom with the greater enterprise community. Hence, there are a number of opportuities to tweak how people learn that can have profound changes in the level of “working smarter.” It’s virgin territory. Sharing the wisdom surrounding learning with the people who need it. It can be a game changer.

snoop

Put yourself in the shoes of someone who has just been told she’s responsible for her own learning. It’s like the dog that got on the bus: Now what do I do? I want to give her a helping hand and a few directions. (My monkey mind just whispered in my ear: Make it a comic book. Who knows.) I want this person to leverage networks, learn with the work team, and have a personal strategy for acquiring, interpreting, acting on, and storing knowledge.

People are becoming forced to act as their own instructional designers, plotting the best personal knowledge strategies and routines. This requires some of adult learning theory’s secret sauce, which we propose to boil down and include in our kit.

In 1978, I remember seeing my first copy of Training magazine and soon thereafter turning on to the work of instructional pioneers like Robert Mager, Gloria Gery, Malcolm Knowles, Joe Harless, and Ron Zemke. It was all new to me. I wasn’t aware there was an entire training industry. We didn’t deal with this when I went to Business School. Instructional design? Never heard of it. Nor have most business executives, and that’s an obstacle. They don’t yet understand the enormous impact of amping up learning in the workplace.

Before I saw that Training magazine, I’d been designing a large instructional system in the dark: I hadn’t been aware of the vast amount of evidence on learning the instructional design community had assembled. (I was a former computer salesman and Army officer.) I led a team that created 120 hours of interactive exercises to teach business and management skills. Design was 100% gut feel and watching what worked. Out of ignorance, I made a number of things less fun and more arduous than need be. That was a 1.0 curriculum, the adult students loved it, but I still feel negligent just knowing how much more it could have meant to them. A thousand people in the Bay Area took that course in the first 18 months; I’m sorry we could not have helped them learn more. Were I to do something like this again, I’d be able to take an enlightened approach. I want to share that how-to with workers everywhere.

The obscurity of Instructional Design outside of the L&D community compels me to provide a brief orientation to ID and a minimalist take on how to use it as part of building learn-to-learn skills.

kin

I plan to write an eBook on learning for learners. Later this may morph into a playlist of experiential exercises; that generally works a lot better than books. But I have to start by pinning down the subject matter and examples.

This will be a Lean Start-Up. I plan to hammer out version 1.0 of the book mercilessly and a little Gonzo. I’ll price it cheap. If learners, not training departments, buy it, I’ll add research, collect the best examples, take polls, spiff it up, and continuously refresh the book.

What’s with the Aha!? I needed a short name for this project. Aha! is the sound of enlightenment. It’s what I hope to hear from the people who learn to learn.

I am open to collaboration on this project. If you’ve got something that works or suggestions, let’s talk.

Who’s the best at helping their people learn?

Do you know of anybody who has tackled preparing independent learners to master complex subjects?

I’ve opened a community on Google+ for articles and discussion. In the spirit of Working Smarter, I intend to work out loud on Aha! Please join in the shouting.

 

 

 

 

 

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Find out what’s going on beyond your borders http://www.internettime.com/2014/10/find-out-whats-going-on-beyond-your-borders/ Sat, 18 Oct 2014 00:29:38 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=19670 Continue reading Find out what’s going on beyond your borders ]]> oeblogo

 

 

 

 

If you want to learn what’s going on in learning and development worldwide, join me in Berlin this December for Online Educa.

You’ll connect with colleagues from a hundred countries!

This is the 20th anniversary of this forum of thought leaders in business, education, and government.

Is it worth it? I certainly think so. This will be my tenth Educa.

 

 

#ITASHARE

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Online Educa Berlin http://www.internettime.com/2013/11/online-educa-berlin-2/ Wed, 20 Nov 2013 18:07:49 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=19422 Continue reading Online Educa Berlin ]]> Brandenburg Gate
In two weeks I’ll be attending my favorite learning event, ONLINE EDUCA BERLIN 2013, the 19th International Conference on Technology-Supported Learning and Training. This will be my tenth or eleventh year attending OEB. Joining colleagues from over a hundred countries and hanging out at Christmas markets has become a habit.Berlin, the day after Educa
Big data and analytics top this year’s agenda. I can hardly wait for the discussions of the ethics of the NSA and invasions of privacy. For my part, I’m going to focus on small data.
storiesMy session, the last event at OEB, Friday December 6, at 4:30 pm, will consist of eighteen personal stories from the last fifty years.

Inspired by French director Jean-Luc Goddard who said that “Every movie has a beginning, middle, and end — though not necessarily in that order,” the audience will select the sequence in which I tell the stories. Pick a number, hear a tale.

I plan talk about aborigines, Andrew Carnegie, Gloria Gery, Hans Monderman, George Carlin, drunk tank pink, the hills of San Francisco, founding the University of Phoenix, the birth of eLearning, the Oxford Union, a trip to the Morgan Motorcar factory, and more.

December 6 is Saint Nicholas day. Leave your boot by the door so Santa can leave you candy if you’ve been good this year.

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An author’s query http://www.internettime.com/2013/06/an-authors-query/ http://www.internettime.com/2013/06/an-authors-query/#comments Wed, 12 Jun 2013 05:16:54 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=19087 bookSo many books, so little time. Does the world need yet another book on learning?

 

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Free-form responses on MOOCs+Business http://www.internettime.com/2013/02/free-form-responses-on-moocsbusiness/ http://www.internettime.com/2013/02/free-form-responses-on-moocsbusiness/#comments Wed, 27 Feb 2013 06:31:45 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=18522 Continue reading Free-form responses on MOOCs+Business ]]>

Free-form responses. n=20, Business+MOOCS Survey 2/25-26/2103

moocltr

What is positive about MOOCs?

Remote access to material/course heretofore unavailable

2/26/2013 3:48 PMView Responses

I had access to professionally presented information that I otherwise would not.

2/26/2013 3:16 PMView Responses

Available anytime and free. Ability to move at own pace.

2/26/2013 7:36 AM

Access to content, arranged logically

2/26/2013 5:22 AMView Responses

“I was there” – like an event, a rock concert.

2/26/2013 12:28 AMView Responses

Admission to content without any restriction. I was impressed how they could use free text responses to qualify the progress of my learning.

2/25/2013 11:34 PMView Responses

You can stop replay. You can discuss with fellow people following the course from all over the world.

2/25/2013 4:24 PMView Responses

Opportunity to learn, free, go at my own pace, take or stop when I want.

2/25/2013 2:18 PMView Responses

Networking with other individuals who may or may not be in your field; Learning more about Google+; Sharing tips; learning from each other

2/25/2013 2:06 PMView Responses

To learn a lot of interesting thigns from great professors in great universities, for free. To spread knowledge around the world.

2/25/2013 1:43 PMView Responses

exposure to thought leaders

2/25/2013 1:41 PMView Responses

open access, open educational resources, networking with interesting people, freedom for own learning goals

2/25/2013 1:28 PMView Responses

I have no idea, as I haven’t participated in one as instructor or student.Anything I say will simply be repeating what I’ve heard from others.

2/25/2013 1:27 PMView Responses

Their reach and low cost.

2/25/2013 1:13 PMView Responses

Able to share a lot of information to people who might not otherwise have the opportunity.

2/25/2013 12:59 AMView Responses

public access to great knowledge JIT

2/25/2013 12:43 AMView Responses

N/A – still learning

2/25/2013 11:42 AMView Responses

I have never experienced them

2/25/2013 11:37 AMView Responses

xxx

2/25/2013 11:25 AMView Responses

Free. Time-shifted.

2/25/2013 11:24 AMView Responses

Access to knowledge

2/25/2013 11:21 AMView Responses

What’s negative about MOOCs?

Easy to fall behind

2/26/2013 3:48 PMView Responses

When you have 45k+ people in a course, there will be a subset who complain about grading, how info was presented, personal issues with the instructor, … and all the other distracting stuff in the message boards. I guess some people expect the same 1:20 attention you find in smaller colleges from a free, online, non-certificate program. I think I got more than my “money’s worth;” others would complain if it rained $100 bills because they couldn’t make change.

2/26/2013 3:16 PMView Responses

Many I have participated are lecture/video based. Not enough interaction. Where there is interaction, it can be overwhelming due to scale.

2/26/2013 7:36 AMView Responses

impersonal, not sure they’re pedagogically interesting.

2/26/2013 5:22 AMView Responses

Drinking from the firehose.

2/26/2013 12:28 AMView Responses

2/25/2013 11:34 PMView Responses

No face to face.

2/25/2013 4:24 PMView Responses

Completion rate. I dont care about it. Learning informally ils what I care.

2/25/2013 2:18 PMView Responses

When they go bad, they go down in a blaze (eg Fundamentals of Online Learning). The crowd can be particularly harsh and scathing.

2/25/2013 2:06 PMView Responses

Pedagogy in xMOOCs. But why can’t we improve it ? That is the challenge !

2/25/2013 1:43 PMView Responses

have to be truly self-directed to be successful

2/25/2013 1:41 PMView Responses

xMOOCs move the whole thing into the wrong direction.

2/25/2013 1:28 PMView Responses

I have no idea, as I haven’t participated in one as instructor or student. Anything I say will simply be repeating what I’ve heard from others.

2/25/2013 1:27 PMView Responses

Potential quality issues.

2/25/2013 1:13 PMView Responses

Was a bit hard to stay focused (most likely b/c I wasn’t focused on a particular degree/path/credit and therefore it took a back seat).

2/25/2013 12:59 AMView Responses

drop out rates, massive

2/25/2013 12:43 AMView Responses

Is it merely the same academic model transferred to the web?

2/25/2013 11:42 AMView Responses

I have never experienced them

2/25/2013 11:37 AMView Responses

xxx

2/25/2013 11:25 AMView Responses

Lack of social interaction

2/25/2013 11:24 AMView Responses

That I feel very much like I’m on my own unless I go in with a group to do it.

2/25/2013 11:21 AMView Responses

 

Observations?

People who are prepared to learn and are willing to accept some limitations of the paradigm are successful. Those that need external motivation or lots of hand holding will not find this fruitful.

2/26/2013 3:16 PMView Responses

MOOCs require strong motivation on the part of the individual learner. In my experience, many people want to be told what they have to know in a defined time and format. I also find that people are willing to set aside an hour for a real-time experience, but find it easy to put off spending an hour on an asynchronous activity. I think MOOCs can be a tremendous tool and advantage for motivated and interested learners – I’m less sanguine about there potential for required or mandated training.

2/26/2013 7:36 AMView Responses

Your term Business+MOOC: Does it rather imply that businesses are going to make use of the content delivered from universities or that businesses are going to make their content available to the public? Or both?

2/25/2013 11:34 PMView Responses

Business do already. See: https://openhpi.de/course/inmemorydatabases https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fFRO8JlRts More on Wednesday 🙂

2/25/2013 4:24 PMView Responses

I have had an active interest in MOOCs for the last two years. I work in the corporate world and to date have not seen any application of this – really, is it in their best interest? Is it their core business? Does it drive revenue? Companies are happy to have their staff attend MOOCs for professional development but I have yet to see if a corporation would create a MOOC. There may be a possibility of the ‘crowd’ seeing through any hidden agendas – is the corporation trying to sell their products and services? Is it trying to collect information from them? Still, i could be totally wrong! It could be a great opportunity to connect companies with their customers? In my experience of the Australian L&D market, many people in my profession (and industry) don’t know what MOOCs are. However, I’d love to be involved in the first project of its kind if a corporate decides to create one. It would be a first for Australia….

2/25/2013 2:06 PMView Responses

In corporate learning, many companies want customized training . That couldn’t be massive.

2/25/2013 1:43 PMView Responses

there is A LOT more learning that needs to be done on this topic for businesses to be successful in implementing MOOCs. They have to learn what the underlying theory is to truly understand their value

2/25/2013 1:41 PMView Responses

Left out my college.

2/25/2013 11:24 AMView Responses

I think there needs to be clear connections to whatever a business values for it to take off. I see this as a vehicle for product or services companies that replace webinars… and in that way, they’ll be useful maybe to organizations as a marketing vehicle, guised in education.

2/25/2013 11:21 AMView Responses

People who are prepared to learn and are willing to accept some limitations of the paradigm are successful. Those that need external motivation or lots of hand holding will not find this fruitful.

2/26/2013 3:16 PMView Responses

MOOCs require strong motivation on the part of the individual learner. In my experience, many people want to be told what they have to know in a defined time and format. I also find that people are willing to set aside an hour for a real-time experience, but find it easy to put off spending an hour on an asynchronous activity. I think MOOCs can be a tremendous tool and advantage for motivated and interested learners – I’m less sanguine about there potential for required or mandated training.

2/26/2013 7:36 AMView Responses

Your term Business+MOOC: Does it rather imply that businesses are going to make use of the content delivered from universities or that businesses are going to make their content available to the public? Or both?

2/25/2013 11:34 PMView Responses

Business do already. See: https://openhpi.de/course/inmemorydatabases https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fFRO8JlRts More on Wednesday 🙂

2/25/2013 4:24 PMView Responses

I have had an active interest in MOOCs for the last two years. I work in the corporate world and to date have not seen any application of this – really, is it in their best interest? Is it their core business? Does it drive revenue? Companies are happy to have their staff attend MOOCs for professional development but I have yet to see if a corporation would create a MOOC. There may be a possibility of the ‘crowd’ seeing through any hidden agendas – is the corporation trying to sell their products and services? Is it trying to collect information from them? Still, i could be totally wrong! It could be a great opportunity to connect companies with their customers? In my experience of the Australian L&D market, many people in my profession (and industry) don’t know what MOOCs are. However, I’d love to be involved in the first project of its kind if a corporate decides to create one. It would be a first for Australia….

2/25/2013 2:06 PMView Responses

In corporate learning, many companies want customized training . That couldn’t be massive.

2/25/2013 1:43 PMView Responses

there is A LOT more learning that needs to be done on this topic for businesses to be successful in implementing MOOCs. They have to learn what the underlying theory is to truly understand their value

2/25/2013 1:41 PMView Responses

Left out my college.

2/25/2013 11:24 AMView Responses

I think there needs to be clear connections to whatever a business values for it to take off. I see this as a vehicle for product or services companies that replace webinars… and in that way, they’ll be useful maybe to organizations as a marketing vehicle, guised in education.

2/25/2013 11:21 AMView Responses

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Update from Europe http://www.internettime.com/2012/12/update-from-europe/ http://www.internettime.com/2012/12/update-from-europe/#comments Thu, 06 Dec 2012 08:42:00 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=7525 Continue reading Update from Europe ]]> Foreign environments exhilarate me. I just got back from Online Educa Berlin and a series of private conversations in Europe. Insights are overflowing my ability to record them and I’m having a ball.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

Online Educa always leaves a special afterglow. Over the course of three days, I conversed with hundreds of colleagues from forty or fifty countries. I used to say that after conversation, the most important learning accelerant was beer. I’ve changed my mind. Riesling is a more effective learning lubricant.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

This year’s highlight was the debate. Donald Clark and Jef Staes convinced an audience filled with academics that “banning schools and universities from awarding degrees and diplomas would improve both competence development and lifelong learning.” Read Donald’s take on the debate here. As recently as a year ago, this outcome would have been impossible.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

The eloquent opening keynotes by Mark Milliron (Western Governors Univesity) and Sir Michael Barber (Pearson) undoubtedly softened up the debate audience. College and universities that fail to change face extinction.

So many friends, too little time.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

After Berlin, I flew to Frankfurt. At an outrageously tasty Italian restaurant, TULSER‘s Jos Arets and Vivian Heijnen and I brainstormed plans to help people be healthy, happy, and productive:

Frankfurt Frankfurt

Stay tuned.

Travel has its up and downs. The biggest downer was United Air Lines. I flew UAL back because I qualified for more legroom – “economy plus.” I don’t know how UAL stays in business.

United Air Lines United Air Lines

Pre-arrival lunch consisted of a bag of potato chips, an inedible cold cheese and turkey roll, a packet of mustard, and a small piece of candy.

“I can’t believe you serve this incredibly unhealthy food,” I told the cabinet attendant as I handed back my untouched meal.

“I can’t either,” she replied. “It’s worse when flying the other direction, and there’s nothing I can do about it. You have more power to fix this than I do, but you don’t have much power either.”

Unlike my Lufthansa flight to Europe, United charges for wine and beer. I paid $7 for a plastic bottle of mediocre red. Also, there’s no individual entertainment. Everyone watches the same movie. I told the cabin attendant I was going to cut my Gold Premier card in pieces and send it to UAL management. She wished me luck.

At the opposite extreme, the Hotel Spenerhaus in Frankfurt was a dream. I had a small but adequate room. Squeaky clean. Across from a church but they’d considerately provided ear plugs. Free Gummi bears on the pillow. Free peanuts on my desk in the afternoon. Fine free breakfast. Free newspaper. Free apples on the counter.

When I checked in, I asked about Wi-Fi. Free. “You are our guest,” said the manager. Recommendations for dinner? A great tapas bar two blocks away the first night. The Italian restaurant served the marvelous antipasti pictured above with lunch. (We returned that evening for pasta with fresh white truffles.) Two blocks from the cathedral. Three blocks from the Christmas market. Surrounded by art galleries and antique stores. Wunderbar.

The function of business is to delight the customer. Hotel Spenerhaus gets it. United Air Lines doesn’t. United says “United is the world’s leading airline and is focused on being the airline customers want to fly, the airline employees want to work for and the airline shareholders want to invest in.” Ha! I bet UAL doesn’t exist ten years from now.

 

 

#itateam

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Michael Allen describes the future of authoring systems http://www.internettime.com/2010/01/michael-allen-describes-the-future-of-authoring-systems/ http://www.internettime.com/2010/01/michael-allen-describes-the-future-of-authoring-systems/#comments Tue, 05 Jan 2010 21:43:17 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=3478 Continue reading Michael Allen describes the future of authoring systems ]]>
At DevLearn 09, Michael Allen gave us a peek at a new authoring system under development at Allen Interactions. (In case you didn’t know, Michael was chief architect of Authorware, the precursor to Macromedia and granddaddy of digital authoring systems.)

His latest project, code-named Zebra, is a powerful, drag-and-drop authoring environment. I’m impressed. I expect Zebra to own the market when it becomes available. I’ll let Michael tell you what he’s got:

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Impact, a new journal on workplace eLearning http://www.internettime.com/2009/12/impact-a-new-journal-on-workplace-elearning/ Mon, 21 Dec 2009 19:53:48 +0000 http://www.internettime.com/?p=3364 Continue reading Impact, a new journal on workplace eLearning ]]> impact

The inaugural issue of Impact, the Journal of Applied Research in Workplace E-learning just appeared on the web. You can read this first issue on the web for free. (Disclosure: I am on Impact’s Editorial Board.)

I’ve read a little over half of the 14 articles. Richard Straub writes cogently about the lay of the eLearning land. Andrew Whitworth presents a fascinating thought piece on context. Stewart Hase explains heutagogy (a new term for me, I’m going to have to re-read this one.) Kay Strong and Holly Hutchins contribute a great overview of connectivism. The case study of eLearning at St George Bank is enlightening; I was intrigued because I’ve talked with these guys and know they’re thoughtful.

Two articles on literature searches puzzled me. The first found a paucity of information about the results of corporate eLearning. The second decried the lack of studies on eLearning in small/medium enterprise. Here’s the rub: both articles were looking in the wrong places. The first looks primarily at academic journals. Why not include CLO magazine and Training? Their readership is corporate; they relate case studies. Neither piece looks at information in the blogosphere. That’s where I find information on what’s happening; often it’s some place I’ve been directed to by Twitter.

Related:
Top 99 Workplace Learning Blogs
OED list of top 100 education blogs
Jay’s learning research page

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