Tag Archives: informal learning

Price of Real Learning going from $2.99 to $6.99

The price of the pdf version of Real Learning will increase from $2.99 to $6.99 on October 25th, a week from today.

Buy enough for your team now. At $2.99 a pop, you could issue a wake-up call to everyone on your floor for a few hundred bucks.

Buy Real Learning here.


Table of Contents       Bibliography

Book Reference Page

Learn from experience without 
instructors or classrooms. 

  • Work smarter and have more impact
  • Learn faster and remember more
  • Embrace openness and learn out loud
  • Make sound learning practices into lifelong habits
  • Co-create knowledge with colleagues
  • Plan how to achieve your growth goals
  • Learn to be the person you aspire to be

Experience is the best teacher. Real Learning provides techniques and the opportunity to practice these:

  •  Self analysis and goal setting
  •  How people learn in organizations
  •  Casting your net into the feeds and flow to extract the good stuff
  •  How to learn – and demonstrate mastery – with curation
  •  Becoming a search ninja
  •  Refining your crap detectors
  •  Strengthening your memory
  •  When to take breaks
  •  Sketching things out
  •  Conditions/attitudes for optimal learning
  •  Seeking new challenges, leaving “Familiarland”
  •  Taking on stretch assignments
  •  Social learning, conversing, making relationship work
  •  Participating in a community of practice
  •  Reflection – on what’s learned, how it’s learned, and how to improve the process
  •  Working out loud
  •  Getting feedback
  •  Talking business
  •  Breaking nasty habits
  • Being mindful

Softcover and e-pub versions will be released next month.



Real Learning explained

Excerpt from interview with Learnnovators

Learnnovators: We are excited about having reviewed your new book Real Learning.  We couldn’t agree more with Laura Overton (Founder & CEO, Towards Maturity) that this is a manual to empower self-directed learners in really practical ways. Could you give our readers a brief on your book that is also a part of a larger part of your Real Learning project please?

Jay: I’d be delighted.

Millions of knowledge workers and their managers have been told they are responsible for their own learning but have no more idea what to do than the dog who got on the bus (Now WTF do I do?). I want to turn them on to what we know about how brains work and get them off on the right track for their meta-learning journey.

real cover

Real Learning seeks to empower people to use their wits and increase their mental capacity. Real Learning helps workers build a sound learning process. “Teach a man to fish.…” Improving one’s capacity to learn pays compound interest for a lifetime.

Real Learning is for people and small groups of colleagues who are taking their professional development into their own hands. No instructors, no classrooms. It’s DIY learning.

For nearly half a century, I’ve helped learners through Learning & Development but L&D only reaches a small sliver of the workforce and their approach is episodic. It doesn’t do much to improve the organization. Most people are unaware that learning is even a variable. I’d like to show the people L&D never reaches how to learn to learn.

Personally, this is a way for me to pay back the people I have learned from over the years and to leave something of value behind as my legacy.

Forgive a stretch analogy, but I’d like to do for learning what Luther did for religion: make the sacred knowledge transparent. Bring things out in the open. (Luther’s big move was to translate the Latin Bible into something ordinary worshippers could read.)

Naturally, the Real Learning project has my fingerprints all over it. I believe:

  • People learn most from experience, not courses.
  • Informal learning sticks because it is need-driven and usually reinforced with immediate application.
  • Learning is ultimately the responsibility of the learner.
  • The world is changing so fast that staying in one’s comfort zone is not an option.
  • Learning scientists and neurologists have discovered many ways to improve learning but few people apply or have even heard about their findings.

I hope to inspire hoards of people to experience learning something significant and remembering how they did it. Again and again and again. Instilling motivation is the key variable for readers who sometimes need shock treatment to experiment and try new things.

With such a huge need, I’m counting on serendipity and newsworthy quirkiness to get publicity started. We’ll need pilot tests, too. That’s what I’m working on now. If you know of an organization that would like to have hundreds of independent learners getting better at what they do and has the ability to monitor feedback, invite them to join me for a pilot session.

Information about the Real Learning project is at http://ahasite.com.

The complete interview with Learnnovators is here.


Informal learning and Stoos management in four slides (Netflix)

Harold Jarche posted this to the internal Internet Time Alliance network yesterday: “Check out slides 115-118” http://www.slideshare.net/reed2001/culture-2009. I did. I was blown away.

Here ’tis:

Culture (Original 2009 version) from Reed Hastings

I’m writing the sequel to Informal Learning. Yet here, the CEO of Netflix gave most of my message four years ago in four slides. Four freaking slides. In case you don’t have time for the whole presentation, here are slides Harold recommended:

Continue reading Informal learning and Stoos management in four slides (Netflix)

Jay’s Informal Learning Super Deck

This deck is my starting point when I’m asked to do a presentation about informal learning. Some of these 350 slides are eight years old; most are less than 24 months.

Flip through the slides. I guarantee you’ll end knowing more

about informal learning than you did on the way in.


On my Walkabout I am experimenting with openness. I’m going to be much more open. I am narrating my work and being more transparent with my thinking. That’s one reason I just posted all my slides.

If Continue reading Jay’s Informal Learning Super Deck

Don’t drink the informal learning snake oil

The Tragedy of eLearning

We’ve seen this movie before.

The 1999 Online Learning conference in Los Angeles was ground zero for eLearning. CBT Systems told the world it was being reincarnated as SmartForce, the eLearning Company. When we unveiled signs at the SmartForce booth, we were the only vendor who mentioned eLearning in the crowded exhibition area. Yet at the ASTD Conference six months later, dozens of vendors claimed to have eLearning. Most of them had changed nothing but their brochures Continue reading Don’t drink the informal learning snake oil

The new workplace

Six years ago few people believed that informal learning made much of a difference. Today’s common wisdom is that most workplace learning is experiential, unplanned, social, and informal.

Informal learning tops many training department agendas. Companies are attracted by the low price tag. However, few of them are doing much systematically. They’ve converted a few programs but they’ve failed to improve their learning ecosystems.

We’ve shifted how we think about learning since the Informal Continue reading The new workplace